Medical Oncology & Hematology

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Medical Oncology and Hematology

Medical Oncology and Hematology refers to the treatment of cancer with medicines, as opposed to surgery or radiation. In some situations, these medicines are used in conjunction with surgery and radiation therapy. Medical Oncology and Hematology services provide chemotherapy treatment, immunotherapy, and treatment for blood disorders.

Chemotherapy Infusion Clinic

(IV and oral therapy)

Traditional chemotherapy works by killing cells that divide rapidly. Cancer cells tend to multiply at a rapid rate. Therefore, the goal of chemotherapy is to destroy cancer cells.

The Oncology Infusion Suite has 12 semi-private treatment chairs. The oncology nursing staff delivers the latest cancer treatments to patients with the same intensity of care and the same chemotherapy and biotherapy drugs as those provided in leading Boston hospitals. The drugs are prepared on site by the Anna Jaques pharmacy staff. The team also administers supportive care medicines, pain management, blood transfusions and intravenous therapy.

The entire staff is specialty trained in oncology, and every nurse in the chemotherapy and infusion clinic is nationally certified in oncology nursing.

Immunologic therapy

This type of treatment stimulates the body's own immune system to work more efficiently to fight the cancer.

Biologic therapy

Biologic therapy is often used to decrease the side effects of chemotherapy. It stimulates production of red blood cells to prevent anemia, and regulates production of white blood cells.


Hormone therapy

Treatment that adds, blocks or removes hormones can be used to treat certain cancers, such as breast and prostate cancer, that rely on hormones for tumor growth. To slow or stop the growth of these tumors, anti-hormone therapies may be given to block the body's natural hormone.

Targeted therapy

Targeted cancer therapies are drugs or other substances that block the growth and spread of cancer by interfering with specific molecules ("molecular targets") located on certain cancer cells. These therapies destroy the cancer cells while leaving normal healthy cells alone.